About the Author:

Jamie-lee Wesley

Jamie belongs to the Gis’gaast (killerwhale) clan and is both from the Gitxsan and Tsimshian Nations in Northwest British Columbia. Born and raised in the Gitxsan Nation, Jamie currently lives in the community of Gitsegukla. She has been a member of the Gitsegukla Gidahmes Dancers for over fifteen years and continues to perform with them, to this day. Throughout the past ten years, Jamie has developed a passion of working and volunteering with Indigenous Youth in her area. She hopes to help break the negative barriers of what it means to be Indigenous by continuing to work and raise up young indigenous leaders as well as influence change while leading by example.

2019 · Youth Policy Program

Language revitalization is something that I feel needs our focus. It is the healing in this process that our Nations should be striving for, and should be putting more action into, in favour of these outcomes of regaining our traditions. With the discussion of a new high school in the Upper Skeena in the works, this new school seems to be a great place to run a pilot program to target the revitalization of our Gitxsan Language and culture at a local level. With efforts such as cultural dance and Gitxsan class (in the elementary schools to lay the foundation for the Gitxsan-speaking language), we see a plateau of language learning in the sense of unlearning Western ways of teaching a language that thrives more on influential experiences and practices. This unlearning is where I have come up with a solution to this particular problem.

About the Author:

Jamie-lee Wesley

Jamie belongs to the Gis’gaast (killerwhale) clan and is both from the Gitxsan and Tsimshian Nations in Northwest British Columbia. Born and raised in the Gitxsan Nation, Jamie currently lives in the community of Gitsegukla. She has been a member of the Gitsegukla Gidahmes Dancers for over fifteen years and continues to perform with them, to this day. Throughout the past ten years, Jamie has developed a passion of working and volunteering with Indigenous Youth in her area. She hopes to help break the negative barriers of what it means to be Indigenous by continuing to work and raise up young indigenous leaders as well as influence change while leading by example.