Ginger Gosnell-Myers

Ginger Gosnell-Myers

Ginger Gosnell-Myers, of Nisga’a and Kwakwak’awakw heritage is passionate about advancing Indigenous rights and knowledge, while breaking down barriers between Indigenous peoples and all Canadians. Ginger was the City of Vancouver’s first Indigenous Relations Manager where she was central to advancing Vancouver as the world’s first official City of Reconciliation, and from 2013-2018 worked to bridge Indigenous policies, programs and relations. Key to this work was Vancouver recognizing that it was on unceded Coast Salish territories – the only government in Canada to officially recognize this. Also integral was implementing the 28 out of the 94 Truth and Reconciliation Commissions Calls to Action, and strengthening the relationship between local First Nations, the urban Indigenous community. From 2008 to 2011, Ginger worked on the Environics Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study as both Project Manager and Public Engagement Director. The UAPS is Canada’s largest research study on Aboriginal people living in urban environments and has become the leading research on urban Aboriginal people’s values, aspirations, experiences, and identity. She has facilitated and spoken at several provincial, national and international events, including the International Indigenous Women & Wellness Conference, the Senate Standing Committee on Aboriginal Peoples, and the United Nations Permanent Forum of Indigenous Peoples. Her commitment to advancing Aboriginal issues led her to work as the Western Assistant to the late and former Minister of Indian and Northern Affairs Development Andy Scott, advising the Minister on issues pertaining to BC and Alberta. Ginger is an Action Canada 2004 Fellow, former Co-Chair to the Assembly of First Nations National Youth Council, former President of Urban Native Youth Association, is a Dialogue Associate with SFU’s Centre for Dialogue, and sits as a Board of Director for the Inspirit Foundation and a Board Member for Greenpeace Canada. She has delivered a Ted Talk – ‘Canadian Shame: A history of Residential Schools’ and a Walrus Talk – ‘Who do you think we are’.